Gender, Race and Urban Space Syllabus S17

Gender, Race and the Urban Space HY 500-002/WS 510-322/AAST 502-002/HY 697-001
Spring 2017 3-5:20pm Thursdays 259 tenHoor
Dr. Sharony Green, sagreen1@ua.edu    Office: Rm. 226, tenHoor
Office hours: 1:00-2pm Mondays or by appointment
 Course Description: “Where is the city?” This is the most urgent question in a course that looks at how the urban space encounters gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality and nationality, among other things. Indeed, we often look at such categories separately or together with the city in mind, but how does the city/village, port or not, act as “agent,” or a space that counters its opposite, something more rural? Along the way, we explore people’s motives for moving, or moving others. We thus discuss power struggles and identity politics across time in and outside the United States, but especially during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Indeed, owing to the ways in which urbanization seems to make our world smaller we study people in many spaces and their multi-layered understandings of the world around them.
Course Goals:
You will analyze the complexities of gender, race and the urban space in and outside the United States.
You will analyze critical turning points in the history of the United States and other countries since European contact with the so-called “New World” through the present day.
You will evaluate primary and secondary source materials to determine historical meaning.
You will demonstrate mastery of course material with clear, coherent writing. You will find connections between course materials via lively discussions.
Attendance:
Is mandatory. Please provide written explanation and doctor’s excuse for necessary absences.
Required Texts:

Sara Ahmed, The Promise of Happiness (Durham: Duke University Press, 2010)

Aline Helg, Liberty and Equality in Caribbean Colombia, 1770-1835 (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2004)

Saidiyah Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008)

Nikki Taylor, Frontiers of Freedom: Cincinnati’s Black Community 1802-1868 (Athens: Ohio University Press, 2005)

Eileen J. Suarez Findlay, Imposing Decency: The Politics of Sexuality and Race in Puerto Rico, 1870-1920 (Durham: Duke University Press, 1999)

Elizabeth Ewen, Immigrant Women in the Land of Dollars: Life and Culture on the Lower East Side, 1890-1925, (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1985)

Victoria W. Wolcott, Remaking Respectability: African American Women in Interwar Detroit (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2001)

Thomas J. Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit (Princeton: Princeton University Press 1996)

Amanda Seligman, Block by Block: Neighborhoods and Public Policy on Chicago’s West Side (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005)

Thomas L. Webber, Flying Over 96th Street: Memoir of an East Harlem White Boy (New York: Scribner,  2004)Philip Kasinitz, Caribbean New York: Black Immigrants and the Politics of Race (New York: Cornell University Press, 1992)

N.D.B. Connolly, A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South Florida (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014)

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of A Yellow Sun (New York: Anchor, 2007)

“Queen of Katwe” (2016), motion picture (available on reserve or online)

 

 

Academic Honesty and Decorum:
All acts of dishonesty in any work constitute academic misconduct. The Academic Misconduct Disciplinary Policy will be followed in the event of misconduct. This includes borrowing from internet sources without attribution. Also, you are expected to behave in a manner conducive to a teaching/learning environment, and those engaging in disruptive behavior (verbal outbursts, cell phone use, reading the newspaper, etc.) will be subject to disciplinary sanctions outlined by the Code of Student Conduct.
Disability Access:
To request disability accommodations, please contact Disability Services (348-4285). After initial arrangements are made with the Office of Disability Services (ODS), contact the instructor.
Emergency Information:
The primary University communication tool for sending out information is the web site www.ua.edu. Students should consult this site as soon as they can in an emergency. The instructor will give course information during an emergency through the course Blackboard site. You should also consult your university email account on a regular basis.
Policy on Missed Coursework:
I understand that extenuating circumstances happen. Email me as soon as possible if you plan to be absent from class. Late or missed assignments will affect your final grade.
Grades:
Your final course grade will be based on the following:
Participation: 10%
Short Summaries: 20%
Class Presentation: 10%
Final Paper –60%
Participation. You are expected to read all assigned readings before class meetings; bring hard copies of all required readings with you to class; attend all sessions; and be prepared to engage in active discussion of the assigned readings.
Short summaries (13): Turn in a 2-4 page typed double-spaced paper in 12 point Times Roman font summary of every reading every week. Identify key theme/argument and how it fits into ongoing discussions about locating “the city” alongside other categories of analysis.
Class Presentation: During the semester, you will be responsible for providing a starting point for class discussion of the required readings at least once, possibly several times. This is your opportunity to guide our discussion and shape it in ways you think are especially important. To accomplish this task, make a brief in-class presentation to the entire class. You need not summarize the reading(s), but rather raise vital issues. You should plan on presenting for 5-10 minutes.
Please direct our attention to issues you find particularly important by, for instance, comparing and contrasting the day’s readings with others we have discussed; pointing out disagreements between different authors; addressing unspoken assumptions or rhetorical effects in the readings; or drawing our attention to aspects of the readings that you found particularly compelling, surprising, challenging. Share what you consider to be the biggest idea developed in the readings.
Final Paper (20 double-spaced pages in 12 point Times Roman font): The central assignment for this course is a Final Paper, which can be on any topic of your choice. Your critique must take into a consideration problems and methods in writing about gender, race and space historically. IT MUST NOT BE A RECYCLED PAPER. Due via Turnitin on Blackboard noon April 29. NO EXTENSIONS.
Ethical Statement
The University of Alabama is committed to an ethical, inclusive community defined by respect and civility. The UAct website (www.ua.edu/uact) provides a list of reporting channels that can be used to report incidences of illegal discrimination, harassment, sexual assault, sexual violence, retaliation, threat assessment or fraud.

WEEK 1 – Jan. 12

Gilbert Osofky, “The Enduring Ghetto,” The Journal of American History, Vol. 55, No. 2 (Sep., 1968) pp. 243-55

WEEK 2 – Jan. 19

Sara Ahmed, The Promise of Happiness (Durham: Duke University Press, 2010)

WEEK 3 – Jan. 26

Aline Helg, Liberty and Equality in Caribbean Colombia, 1770-1835 (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2004)

WEEK 4 – Feb. 2

Saidyah Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008)

WEEK 6 – Feb. 9

Nikki Taylor, Frontiers of Freedom: Cincinnati’s Black Community 1802-1868 (Athens: Ohio University Press, 2005)

WEEK 5 – Feb. 16

Eileen J. Suarez Findlay, Imposing Decency: The Politics of Sexuality and Race in Puerto Rico, 1870-1920 (Durham: Duke University Press, 1999)

WEEK 7 – Feb. 23

Elizabeth Ewen, Immigrant Women in the Land of Dollars: Life and Culture on the Lower East Side, 1890-1925, (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1985)

WEEK 8 – Mar. 2

Victoria W. Wolcott, Remaking Respectability: African American Women in Interwar Detroit (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2001)

WEEK 9 –  Mar. 9

Thomas J. Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit (Princeton: Princeton University Press 1996)

SPRING BREAK

WEEK 10 – Mar. 23

Amanda Seligman, Block by Block: Neighborhoods and Public Policy on Chicago’s West Side (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005)

WEEK 11 –Mar. 30

Raymond A. Mohl and Mark H. Rose, Interstate: Highway Politics and Policy Since 1939 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2012)

WEEK 12 – Apr. 6

Philip Kasinitz, Caribbean New York: Black Immigrants and the Politics of Race (New York: Cornell University Press, 1992)

WEEK 13 – Apr. 13

Thomas L. Webber, Flying Over 96th Street: Memoir of an East Harlem White Boy (New York: Scribner,  2004)

WEEK 14– Apr. 20

N.D.B. Connolly, A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South Florida (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014)

WEEK 15– Apr. 27

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of A Yellow Sun (New York: Anchor, 2007)

“Queen of Katwe” (2016), motion picture

 

 

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