African American History · women's history

nettie, zora, california, eliza…saying their names

It’s been a powerful week for thinking through the experiences of women. I was able to read a 1950 newspaper article about Alabama-born and Florida-bred novelist Zora Neale Hurston. It was published in The Miami Herald, my former employer. There’s nothing like reading an archival document that permits you to go back in time. Not… Continue reading nettie, zora, california, eliza…saying their names

University of Alabama · women · women's history

women of the Tide comment on women of the Tide

Congrats to these students in my “American Civilization Since 1865” course for taking advantage of an extra credit opportunity to visit Gorgas House and see an exhibit highlighting the contributions of women on our campus, among them postbellum librarian and postmistress Amelia Gayle who “was the glue that held this school together” following the stroke… Continue reading women of the Tide comment on women of the Tide

antebellum · women's history

Alabama Heritage magazine article in mailbox today

    I opened my mailbox and smiled. The latest issue of Alabama Heritage was inside. Among the featured stories is an article I wrote on how young women sidestepped stereotypes about southern belles by obtaining an education in the years leading to and beyond the Civil War. Above is a picture of African American… Continue reading Alabama Heritage magazine article in mailbox today

africa · caribbean · cities · gentrification · graduate student · higher education · miami · migration · slavery · teaching · urban · women's history

spring with the city in view

Yesterday I finally saw “Queen of Katwe,” a motion picture about an African girl who becomes a chess champion. I was struck by the power surrounding the word “city” as her instructor shared stories of how he felt alongside seemingly better chess players who resided in urban spaces. I was reminded again of the importance… Continue reading spring with the city in view